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Price comparison with reviews and photography tips for all major brands of digital cameras and lenses including Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Sigma and Tamron. Check out our blog for photography tutorials, camera reviews and see some examples of great photography. If you're looking for a bargain, set a price alert on one of our product pages, e.g. for the Nikon D7100, and be instantly emailed when a cheap digital camera or lens becomes available.

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I stumbled across a tutorial recently on how to produce those excellent reflections through water drops. Yuval Vaknin takes you through the process of macro photography using glycerin drops. I guess glycerin is better than water as it keeps it's shape better. It's quite a drawn out process, but as you can see from the tutorial, the results are very impressive.
 
Once you have got all the equipment you are going to need (please see my other post - Bird photography - What you need and how to use it) it is time to get out there and and get some photos. Below are a few techniques and tips to help you obtain better bird photos and to produce more 'keepers'. Composing a photo involves you setting parameters in order to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing photo and whilst this may seem impossible in the field there are some things you can do before you press the shutter button and some you can do afterwards . Please do not take these tips to be set in stone, they should be used as a general rule only, and in some cases you may find that going against the norm produces the best photo.
 
The technique of "photo stitching" has been around a while, and was used even in traditional or analogue photography, albeit in a crude way. In the past, photos were stitched together using transparent tape. Today, in the digital world, computers do the work, but the idea is still the same. The technique consists of taking several overlapping pictures and editing them with computer software (known as post processing) to obtain a single panorama covering up to 360 degrees. Some compact cameras have an integrated feature which achieves the same effect without the need for post-processing. But in order to achieve the highest quality, you often need to do it yourself.
 
To be able to photograph the Northern Lights, a bit of planning is required. In fact, the Northern Lights are only visible in the "Auroral Oval" at high latitudes around the Polar Circles, and where there is no light pollution, far from the big cities. Some well known areas for photographing the Northern Lights include Lapland and the north of Scandinavia, Alaska and Iceland. It's more difficult to find a good spot in the Southern hemisphere around the Antarctic Circle. In the Southern hemisphere the Southern Lights are called the Aurora Australis.
 
Obviously, it would be great if it was possible to make a bit of an income selling photographs. BBC Click recently published a short video about how to sell your photographs online.
 
The Royal Photographic Society in the UK are offering bursaries for photography projects which promote environmental awareness. Each bursary can be up-to &3000 and can cover photographic equipment, travel costs, and other related expenses. This seems like a great opportunity and one not to be missed.