Panning: be a mover not a shaker

 

When you’re a kid, you’re told to keep the camera as still as possible. Good advice – usually. However, if you want to get the most impressive action shots then you’ll need to be nimble. This article describes how to use the panning technique.

Composing Your Bird Photographs

 

Once you have got all the equipment you are going to need (please see my other post – Bird photography – What you need and how to use it) it is time to get out there and and get some photos. Below are a few techniques and tips to help you obtain better bird photos and to produce more ‘keepers’. Composing a photo involves you setting parameters in order to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing photo and whilst this may seem impossible in the field there are some things you can do before you press the shutter button and some you can do afterwards . Please do not take these tips to be set in stone, they should be used as a general rule only, and in some cases you may find that going against the norm produces the best photo.

Bird Photography – What you need and how to use it

 

It is of little wonder why so many people take the time to photograph birds, the natural variation present in this group of organisms together with the fact that they can be found on your doorstep make them a very accessible subject to photograph. However it can be quite daunting when you first decide you want to start photography or want to step up your hobby with the aim of getting a DSLR.

Light painting, drawing with light using a long exposure photo

 

Light painting is not difficult to learn, doesn’t require much experience and is a lot of fun! The idea behind this technique is really simple: while shooting a long exposure photo, move a source of light around, this gets recorded onto the sensor of the camera as an abstract drawing or ‘light painting’.