Welcome to SLR Joe.

Price comparison with reviews and photography tips for all major brands of digital cameras and lenses including Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Sigma and Tamron. Check out our blog for photography tutorials, camera reviews and see some examples of great photography. If you're looking for a bargain, set a price alert on one of our product pages, e.g. for the Nikon D7100, and be instantly emailed when a cheap digital camera or lens becomes available.

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2011 has been a great year for wildlife photography and there have been some amazing photos taken. Below is a collection of some of the best, from locations including the UK, US, Australia, Kenya, Ecuador and Ethiopia.
 
I stumbled across a tutorial recently on how to produce those excellent reflections through water drops. Yuval Vaknin takes you through the process of macro photography using glycerin drops. I guess glycerin is better than water as it keeps it's shape better. It's quite a drawn out process, but as you can see from the tutorial, the results are very impressive.
 

I stumbled across Alexandre's online photography course recently. He's a mountain adventure photographer which I'm reckoning affords him the opportunity to take some truly stunning photographs.

The online courses are very comprehensive covering technicalities such as ISO, metering modes, focal length up to the more subjective areas including composition and where to get inspiration.


 
In this article I will cover a couple of techniques on how to take photos at night. This includes: How to take photos in low light, how to take photos with both the subject and the background brightly illuminated, how to take photos of moving objects (traffic lights at night) and how to take photos of lights (the bokeh effect). In this post I have used the following equipment: Cannon 1000D DLSR, Canon 18-55mm Kit lens, Tamron 70-300mm lens, Joby Gorilla Tripod, Simpex 1200 standard tripod. Please note that the aperture has been opened up completely for all the photos, mostly f/5.6.
 
If, like me you're blessed with being left handed, you can now buy a camera specifically designed to our hand of choice. Now i don't know whether this would bother me personally as I think I've pretty much gotten used to using a standard camera, but everyone's different I guess! The camera in this case is the Canon 7DL and more details can be found at the digital picture
 
I was fortunate enough to visit the London 2012 Olympics during the athletics, so thought it would be an ideal opportunity to try out the Canon 50D (thanks James). I've previously tested out both the Canon 40D, and Canon 60D, so putting the 50D through its paces seemed like a good idea! I took with me my trusty Sigma 70-300mm telephoto lens, as well as the Canon 17-40mm F4L for any wide-angle shots.
 
Once you have got all the equipment you are going to need (please see my other post - Bird photography - What you need and how to use it) it is time to get out there and and get some photos. Below are a few techniques and tips to help you obtain better bird photos and to produce more 'keepers'. Composing a photo involves you setting parameters in order to achieve a more aesthetically pleasing photo and whilst this may seem impossible in the field there are some things you can do before you press the shutter button and some you can do afterwards . Please do not take these tips to be set in stone, they should be used as a general rule only, and in some cases you may find that going against the norm produces the best photo.
 
To be able to photograph the Northern Lights, a bit of planning is required. In fact, the Northern Lights are only visible in the "Auroral Oval" at high latitudes around the Polar Circles, and where there is no light pollution, far from the big cities. Some well known areas for photographing the Northern Lights include Lapland and the north of Scandinavia, Alaska and Iceland. It's more difficult to find a good spot in the Southern hemisphere around the Antarctic Circle. In the Southern hemisphere the Southern Lights are called the Aurora Australis.