Welcome to SLR Joe.

Price comparison with reviews and photography tips for all major brands of digital cameras and lenses including Canon, Nikon, Sony, Pentax, Sigma and Tamron. Check out our blog for photography tutorials, camera reviews and see some examples of great photography. If you're looking for a bargain, set a price alert on one of our product pages, e.g. for the Nikon D7100, and be instantly emailed when a cheap digital camera or lens becomes available.

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The City of Levallois in France runs an annual photography competition for people aged 35 and under. The top prize for winning is a staggering 10,000 euros and the deadline for entries is 20th May 2013. Get submitting!
 
The technique of "photo stitching" has been around a while, and was used even in traditional or analogue photography, albeit in a crude way. In the past, photos were stitched together using transparent tape. Today, in the digital world, computers do the work, but the idea is still the same. The technique consists of taking several overlapping pictures and editing them with computer software (known as post processing) to obtain a single panorama covering up to 360 degrees. Some compact cameras have an integrated feature which achieves the same effect without the need for post-processing. But in order to achieve the highest quality, you often need to do it yourself.
 
WIth an opportunity to visit the beautiful City of Paris, I thought I'd take the chance to try out the Canon EOS 5D, along with my trusty Canon 17-40mm and 15mm fisheye. The Canon 5D is an older camera, launched in 2005, and it's price has been dropping steadily thanks to the introduction of more recent full frames such as the Canon 5D Mark 3, the Canon 6D and Nikon D600. So, if you're looking for a cheap full frame digital slr, then the Canon 5D could be a decent option.
 
If you've ever seen those waterfall photographs where it's bright daylight but the water appears to be flowing smoothly as if the shutter speed is very slow, you're probably looking at a photo taken with a neutral density filter over the lens. They basically darken the scene allowing for a longer shutter speed to be used when there is still bright sunlight. Graduated neutral density filters are also popular. GND filters darken part of a scene, e.g. a bright sky, allowing a more even illumination throughout the picture. Below are a few great examples of photos taken with neutral density filters, I hope you enjoy them.
 

In April, Nikon is opening a school in London to encourage people to embrace the wonderful world of photography. Ok it's not free, but if you want some top quality hands on training, you could do a lot worse than go to the source - so to speak - and learn from Nikon!

The school is based at Nikon's centre of Excellence near Oxford Circus, in London. Typically course fees are £119+, although they are currently running a £20 discount if you book before May 1st 2013.


 
If you're fortunate to live near some stunning mountain scenery or perhaps you're about to head off on your travels, then have a look at this tutorial over at Nature photographers. It's a great little tutorial covering the main points of photographing mountains and mountain ranges.